July 18, 2017
Leaving new bales in the field is like leaving dirty dishes in the sink. Sure, it’s convenient at the time, but in both situations after a while they begin to stink. You can end up enabling future unwanted mold growth and, in the case of hay, inhibit desirable forage growth beneath the bale. In most cases, any bales left on the field are potentially damaging the next cutting’s yield. Bruce Anderson, University of Nebraska extension forage specialist, cautions...


July 18, 2017
A cow spends a significant amount of time during any given day chewing on forage particles. The ability to chew down forage particles into a manageable size for digestion is foundational in the utiliz...


July 11, 2017
While predominantly used for soil and water conservation, cover crops can also be effectively utilized for winter grazing. Aside from extending the grazing season by taking advantage of quality forage...


July 11, 2017
Dry conditions in the High Plains have livestock producers on high alert for possible livestock nitrate poisoning. Extension specialists at North Dakota State University (NDSU) were quick to offer adv...


July 4, 2017
Barn fires never happen, until they happen. While racing the rain and harvesting that last cutting may be cause for celebration, hold the applause for a few weeks. Hay that is cut and baled with high moisture is at risk for spontaneous combustion for up to three weeks as the plant cells are still respiring. “When baled at moistures over 20 percent, mesophilic (warm temperature) bacteria release heat, causing temperatures to reach between 130°F and 140°F,” says...


July 4, 2017
While death and taxes may be certain, another time-tested truth is that weather is never truly predictable. Although climate change remains a heated debate, it is no secret that every growing season comes with greater extremes and subsequent challenges...


June 27, 2017
For any operation that always seems to have too many irons in the fire, buying hay rather than making it might just sound appealing. Bryon Kirwan, Illinois Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) state economist, asked the question, “Can you buy hay cheaper than making it?” in a presentation given at the Illinois Forage Expo earlier this month.Kirwan sees many producers baling as a way to control the quality of their feed source and to effectively use acreage...


June 27, 2017
Although harvest is typically an end point, some producers may choose to head right back to the field with the grain drill in an effort to better meet fall and winter livestock forage needs. When plan...


June 20, 2017
With many auction purchases, there is an assumed risk that you might not entirely know what you’re getting. This certainly is true for buying hay. Sure, you can walk around the truck or wagon and ma...


June 20, 2017
Unfortunately, most of the country is not blessed with a climate that allows one specific grass to thrive year-round. Adaptive as always, producers are able to get around this by growing both warm- an...