Aug. 8, 2017
As critical drought conditions plague North Dakota, producers in Michigan are stepping in to lend a hand. North Dakota Department of Agriculture (NDDA) and the North Dakota State University&nbs...


Aug. 8, 2017
Soil health experts champion the idea of using cover crops for a variety of reasons. As defined by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), cover crops control erosion, maintain soil health...


Aug. 1, 2017
There’s no question that soil health is key to the sustainability of a grazing operation. What is in question, however, is the actual effect of winter bale grazing on soil health. Simply put, many enthusiasts praise this method for adding nutrients immediately back into the soil through hay litter and manure, making the cost of hay seemingly irrelevant. However, no data has supported the claims that the benefits to soil outweigh the cost of hay at almost any...


Aug. 1, 2017
(From left) Jessica Jurcek, Kirsten Jurcek, and Weenonah BrattsetFor Kirsten Jurcek, operating a grass-fed and finished beef farm is sustainable not only to her family, but to the land as well. Jurcek runs Brattset Family Farm full time with the help of her mother, Weenonah, and daughter, Jessica. Weenonah bought the 183-acre farm outside of Jefferson, Wis., in 1968 and moved her children to Wisconsin while her husband, Harold, continued to work in Chicago as a firefighter...


July 25, 2017
When life gives you drought, make corn silage from your stressed grain crop. As dry conditions wear on in the Upper Plains, some producers are considering salvaging their corn cash crop as feed. “I...


July 25, 2017
Planning is especially vital for fall forage production. While yield may be higher if planted early, dry weather and pest pressure are limiting factors. The contrary is true for late fall planting. University of Arkansas researchers conducted a field trial to compare seven winter-annual forages for fall forage yield with early and late planting dates. Spring oat, winter oat, rye, wheat, triticale, ryegrass, and rape were tested at research centers in both Fayetteville...


July 18, 2017
Leaving new bales in the field is like leaving dirty dishes in the sink. Sure, it’s convenient at the time, but in both situations after a while they begin to stink. You can end up enabling future unwanted mold growth and, in the case of hay, inhibit desirable forage growth beneath the bale. In most cases, any bales left on the field are potentially damaging the next cutting’s yield. Bruce Anderson, University of Nebraska extension forage specialist, cautions...


July 18, 2017
A cow spends a significant amount of time during any given day chewing on forage particles. The ability to chew down forage particles into a manageable size for digestion is foundational in the utiliz...


July 11, 2017
While predominantly used for soil and water conservation, cover crops can also be effectively utilized for winter grazing. Aside from extending the grazing season by taking advantage of quality forage...


July 11, 2017
Dry conditions in the High Plains have livestock producers on high alert for possible livestock nitrate poisoning. Extension specialists at North Dakota State University (NDSU) were quick to offer adv...