Jan. 18, 2022
Most grazing systems are anchored by perennial forages, which means there are parts of the year when pasture productivity will take a plunge. To fill these gaps and ensure steady feed supplies later i...


Jan. 18, 2022
With fertilizer currently priced at about $1 per unit of nitrogen, farmers and extension specialists are turning over every rock to try to find economical means of producing forage without buying a lo...


Jan. 11, 2022
Ringing in the new year often encourages people to declare resolutions. Cow-calf producers among this group of goal-setters may resolve to enhance livestock production, and to do this they must...


Jan. 11, 2022
Photo: Eldon Cole, University of MissouriThe symptoms of a bad case of fescue toxicity are well-documented. One symptom — fescue foot — can become more apparent when temperatures drop during the w...


Jan. 4, 2022
Snow isn’t the only thing cattle might be sinking their hooves in this season. Mud may also cover fields when hay is fed in the winter, and it can lead to more than just a mess. Mud can reduce anima...


Jan. 4, 2022
We’ve now turned the calendar to a new year, and this is a good time to take stock of stored forage inventories, knowing that any forage additions at this point can only be accomplished by withdrawa...


Dec. 28, 2021
Determining the best way to stockpile forage for winter feeding is a farm-by-farm, and sometimes a field-by-field, decision. It’s no secret what this tactic is, but knowing when to start stockpiling...


Dec. 28, 2021
It’s been another year of farm and ranch struggles and successes. If you weren’t always locked in on eHay Weekly every Tuesday morning, here’s a list of the 10 most popular articles that filtere...


Dec. 21, 2021
Photo: Garland Dahlke, Iowa State UniversitySwath grazing can save livestock producers time, labor, and money. This winter feeding strategy involves cutting forage in late fall and raking it into wind...


Dec. 21, 2021
Since the Clean Air Act of 1970 was enacted, precipitation that is laden with sulfur, dubbed acid rain, has all but disappeared. That’s a good thing, but this change has some agronomic ramifications...